Germany: Anti-Islam Leader Goes On Trial For Racism

Must Read

Retired NBA Player, Kobe Bryant, Dies In Helicopter Crash

Retired NBA player, Kobe Bryant has lost his life at the age of 41 in a helicoper crash in...

Why Amotekun Must Not Be Allowed To Operate: Tanko Yakasai

Tanko Yakasai, has advised the federal government against accepting the Western Nigeria Security Network code-named: Amotekun. He said this while...

Boy Killed, Several Injured As Boko Haram Bombs Borno Mosque

  Following the attack by Boko Haram sect on a mosque in Gwoza, Borno state, on Sunday, a 12-year-old child...

Lassa Fever: Doctor Quarantined In Jigawa, Another Case Confirmed In Ogun

A medical doctor has been quarantined after showing signs of Lassa fever at Jahun local government area of Jigawa...

TY Danjuma’s Opinion Doesn’t Matter: Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari had slammed Theophilus Danjuma, retired general, saying his opinion doesn't matter than that of millions of...

e2b9e5db322247f884b5f5537dd92347_18

The founder of Germany’s anti-Islam movement, PEGIDA, will appear in court on hate speech charges for branding refugees “cattle” and “scum” on social media. Lutz Bachmann, founder of the far-right “Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the Occident” movement, was charged in October with inciting racial hatred through a series of widely shared Facebook posts.

The trial on Tuesday will be held under tight security in Dresden in the former communist east, the birthplace of PEGIDA, which bitterly opposes Chancellor Angela Merkel’s liberal migration policy that brought more than a million asylum seekers to Germany last year.

The court said the 43-year-old’s comments, which date back to 2014, also “disrupted public order” and constituted an “attack on the dignity” of refugees. If found guilty, Bachmann could face between three months and five years in jail. The comments were published in September 2014, shortly before PEGIDA started life as a xenophobic Facebook group.

The group initially drew just a few hundred supporters to demonstrations in Dresden before gaining strength, peaking with rallies of up to 25,000 people in early 2015. Also on Tuesday, police arrested five people near Dresden whom they suspected of forming a far-right militant group, according to Reuters news agency. The public prosecutor’s office said they were preparing attacks on asylum seekers using explosives.

- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -