Nigeria can use alternative power sources like Denmark – Gbenga Adeyinka

Popular comedian, Gbenga Adeyinka the 1st, speaks  about his memorable trip to Denmark

What is your most memorable travel experience?

I have been to many countries, and I can’t even decide which one to pick, but I really enjoyed my trip to Denmark. It was a memorable one for me.

When did you travel to Denmark?

I travelled to the European country three years ago.

How long did you stay in Denmark?

I stayed for about 10 days at a nice hotel.

What was the highlight of your trip to Denmark?

The highlight of my trip to Denmark was my visit to their parks. I had lots of fun. There was this particular park I took pictures at, there were lots of fishes in the pond and they were just swimming freely without anyone disturbing them. I really had an awesome experience there. Everything in Denmark is so well organised and I keep wondering why we don’t have that type of system back home.

What would a first timer find intriguing about Denmark?

What anyone will find interesting is that as soon as you arrive in Denmark, you will see a lot of wind vanes. That is how they generate their own electricity. The type of development in advanced countries can be achieved here in Nigeria if we make use of the resources we have. For instance, Lagos can generate its own electricity through the use of water energy. We can also generate electricity in the North through the use of solar energy. The Power Holding Company of Nigeria alone cannot take care of all our energy needs so we as a country have to think.

Did you see anything in Denmark that reminded you of Nigeria?

Nothing in particular, except the fact that Danish people are warm and caring. When you greet them, they would respond, which is very unlike white people. The Danes greet you first and they love football, which is very common with us too.

What did you find most impressive about Denmark?

From where I stayed, I didn’t see much. But I saw something that shocked me at the train station. When I was about leaving the country, I still had some of their currencies with me so I wanted to change it. I saw a guy who I could have sworn was a Nigerian. I identified him with the bathroom slippers he wore, so I approached him to see if he could help me. But the guy denied that he was a Nigerian, even though his Yoruba accent was very noticeable as he spoke. I was really shocked that some people are not proud of where they come from.

Did you try any of their local food?

No. I don’t try oyinbo food. I eat only Nigerian food when I travel abroad.

What did you see in Denmark that you would love to replicate in Nigeria?

That would be the wind vane. I would import so many and convince Nigerians to use them and at the same time, I will become rich in the process. Everything in Denmark is structured and orderly.

Do they have good relationship with Nigerians?

Yes, they do; some of their football players are from Nigeria. I remember I performed at a club and I asked them if they knew Nigerians and they started mentioning the names of their football players who are from Nigeria.

Did you purchase any artefact from Denmark?

No, I didn’t; but I bought a pair of shorts because I loved the colour. It was when I got back to Nigeria that I realised that it was made with adire material. It got me thinking that Nigerian designers can start making adire beach wears, instead of the normal ones that were are used to.

What is your best travel advice to anyone who wants to travel?

Don’t travel to run away. Travel to have a holiday and come back.

source: Punch

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