Comptroller-General Of Customs, Ali Knows Fate Tomorrow

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Ardent Reader, News Freak, Socio-Political Commentator, Archaeologist & Pro-Democrat.

Federal High Court, Lagos, judgment, Hameed Ali, Comptroller-General of the Nigeria Customs ServiceA Federal High Court in Lagos, has fixed Friday, September 16, to deliver judgment in a suit, challenging the appointment of Hameed Ali, a retired colonel, as the Comptroller-General of the Nigeria Customs Service (NCS).

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the suit, which was instituted by a Human Rights Activist, Mr. Ebun-Olu Adegboruwa, in November 2015, was argued before Justice Sule Hassan.

Mr. Adegboruwa sought the interpretation of the court as to whether the president could appoint anyone as comptroller-general of customs without complying with Section 3 of the Official Gazette of the Federal Republic of Nigeria made on March 25, 2002.

He argued that the said gazette stipulated that only those within the rank of Deputy Comptroller-General of Customs could be elevated as substantive Comptroller- General.

The lawyer, therefore, asked the court to nullify the appointment.

In response to the case, the Nigeria Customs Service filed a preliminary objection dated April 29, 2016, challenging the locus standi of the applicant to file and maintain the suit.

The Customs Service contended further that Adegboruwa’s suit was a mere academic exercise raising hypothetical questions that the court must not entertain.

NAN reports that the court heard arguments from counsels to the parties on June 15 and adjourned for judgment.

The judgment is now slated to be delivered on Sept. 16.

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